Core Cornell Faculty

John D. Albertson

Professor, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

John Albertson is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University.  Albertson joined the Cornell faculty in July of 2015 from Duke University where he was department chair of Civil and Environmental Engineering.  Albertson’s research is focused on atmospheric turbulent transport, with an emphasis on data-model fusion for impact mitigation.  His activity with the Veho Institute surrounds mobile sensing of air quality in urban environments and the general advancement of smart city technologies. 

 

 

Mark Campbell

John A. Mellowes ’60 Professor in Mechanical Engineering, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Mark Campbell is a John A. Mellowes ’60 Professor in Mechanical Engineering at Cornell University. He is interested in autonomy for robotics, aircraft, and spacecraft. Research areas include sensor fusion and perception; decentralized estimation and control; human decision modeling and human-robotics interaction; nonlinear and hybrid estimation theory; formation flying spacecraft, and structural dynamics and control. Professor Campbell’s educational areas include control systems, estimation, and space systems with an emphasis on experiential learning projects.

Ricardo A Daziano

Associate Professor, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Ricardo A Daziano, Ph.D. in economics, is an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Cornell University. Daziano is an expert in modeling economic choices by consumers using advanced simulation-based econometric methods, with empirical research focus on response to vehicle automation and on the determination of willingness to pay for vehicle technology including electrification. He is also interested in the non-market valuation of environmental benefits, energy efficiency, safety gains, and qualitative vehicle features. In terms of methodological contributions, Daziano works on deriving Bayes and frequentist estimators of preference parameters that are flexible enough to recover unobserved heterogeneity and to ensure accurate market share predictions. 

Peter Frazier

Associate Professor, School of Operations Research and Information Engineering

Peter Frazier is an Associate Professor in the School of Operations Research and Information Engineering at Cornell University and a Staff Data Scientist at Uber. His work in operations research and machine learning includes Bayesian Optimization, Simulation, Multi-armed bandits and incentive design for social learning, and materials design, biochemistry, drug discovery, and medicine.

H. Oliver Gao

Professor, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Dr. Gao is a Professor in the graduate fields of Civil and Environmental Engineering (Transportation Systems Engineering), Systems Engineering at Cornell University. He is also the Director of Cornell Systems Engineering, and Center for Transportation, Environment, and Community Health and the Associate Director of the Cornell Program in Infrastructure Policy. His research focuses on transportation systems, environmental energy, and sustainable development.

Donald Greenberg

Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Computer Graphics, School of Architecture Art Planning

Donald Greenberg, the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Computer Graphics, has been researching and teaching in the field of computer graphics since 1966. During the last 15 years, he has been primarily concerned with research advancing the state-of-the-art in computer graphics and with utilizing these techniques as they may be applied to a variety of disciplines. His specialties include real-time realistic image generation, color science, and computer-aided architectural design.

Brian Kirby

Meinig Family Professor of Engineering, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Brian Kirby is the Meinig Family Professor of Engineering in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University.  He currently directs the Micro/Nanofluidics Laboratory in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University. His research interests include Multiphase and Granular Flows, Microfluidics, Micro Nano Systems, Materials Design, and Advanced Manufacturing and Materials.

Helen Nissenbaum

Professor, School of Information Science

 Helen Nissenbaum is a Professor at Cornell Tech and in the Information Science Department at Cornell University. She is also Director of the Digital Life Initiative, which was launched in 2017 at Cornell Tech to explore societal perspectives surrounding the development and application of digital technology, focusing on ethics, policy, politics, and quality of life. Her own research takes an ethical perspective on policy, law, science, and engineering relating to information technology, computing, digital media, and data science. Topics have included privacy, trust, accountability, security, and values in technology design.

 

Jamol Pender

Assistant Professor, School of Operations Research and Information Engineering

Jamol Pender is an Assistant Professor in the School of Operations Research and Information Engineering at Cornell University. His research interests include queueing theory, applied probability, Markov processes, control theory, and mathematical finance. His activity with the Veho Institute surrounds Real-Time Operation and Look-Ahead Assistance in vehicles.

Clifford R Pollock

Ilda And Charles Lee Professor of Engineering, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

 Cilfford Pollock is the Idla and Lee Professor of Engineering at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University. His major research focus has been in tunable lasers, the generation of ultrashort optical pulses, and the design of optical waveguide devices. His current research is directed at femtosecond-duration pulses of tunable radiation, novel infrared laser sources, and LED lighting. He served as director of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering from 2014-2018 and from 2000-2007, and spent a lot of time working on school issues such as hiring good faculty and identifying strategic directions. He is a topical editor for Optics Letters, a leading journal for laser research.

Patrick Michael Reed

Joseph C. Ford Professor of Engineering, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Patrick Reed is a Joseph C. Ford Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. His primary research interests relate to sustainable water management given conflicting demands from renewable energy systems, ecosystem services, expanding populations, and climate change. The tools developed in Dr. Reed’s group bridge sustainability science, risk management, economics, multiobjective decision making, operations research, computer science, and high-performance computing.

Samitha Samaranayake

Assistant Professor, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Samitha Samaranayake is an Assistant Professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and a Graduate Field Faculty in the School of Operations Research and Information Engineering, the Center for Applied Math and the Systems Engineering Program at Cornell. His research interests are in the modeling, analysis, and control of networked urban infrastructure systems with a focus on transportation networks. He works primarily on problems related to vehicle routing with applications in route planning with reliability guarantees, dynamic traffic assignment and control, and ride-sharing systems and is particularly interested in developing computationally efficient solution techniques and algorithms that enable practical applications.

David B. Shmoys

Laibe/Acheson Professor of Business Management & Leadership Studies, School of Operations Research and Information Engineering

David B. Shmoys is a Laibe/Acheson Professor of Business Management and Leadership Studies in the School of Operations Research and Information Engineering at Cornell University. The primary focus of his research is on the design and analysis of efficient algorithms for discrete optimization problems, and in particular, on approximation algorithms for NP-hard and other computationally intractable problems. Linear programming relaxations have played a fundamental role in obtaining good solutions to hard optimization problems, and he continues to study their application to a range of problems in clustering, sequencing, and scheduling, and inventory problems, in both deterministic and stochastic optimization settings. In addition to studying these problems with a theoretical lens, he has been involved in the practical application of these techniques in settings ranging from genomics to medical aircraft scheduling to the long-term planning for the preservation of the red-cockaded woodpecker to the operational logistics and design of bike-sharing systems.

Sadaf Sobhani

Assistant Professor, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Sadaf Sobhani is an Assistant Professor in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University.  Her research activities focus on developing high-efficiency, low-emission, and robust thermal management and energy conversion systems. She explores rigorous pathways to apply topology optimization techniques combined with additive manufacturing and non-intrusive diagnostics to design, fabricate and analyze tailored structures in combustion, electrochemistry, and other complex flow systems. Previously, Dr. Sobhani worked as a research associate at the NASA Ames Research Center and the United Nations Foundation, Energy and Climate Department. She received her doctorate degree in mechanical engineering from Stanford University.

Michael Tomlan

Professor, Director of Historic Preservation Planning, School of Architecture Art Planning

Michael A. Tomlan directs the graduate program in historic preservation planning. He teaches classes that deal with documentation techniques, fieldwork, preservation practice and urban change, the relationships between museums and the public, and preservation, planning, and religion. Tomlan is also involved in finance and economics.  He serves as a member of the admissions committee of the Baker Program in Real Estate, is the faculty editor of the Cornell Real Estate Review, and offers courses in international cases and competitions.

Alexander Vladimirsky

Professor, Department of Mathematics

Alex Vladimirsky is an applied mathematician at Cornell University, whose interests span nonlinear PDEs, dynamical systems, optimal control & differential games, numerical analysis, and algorithms on graphs.  His past and current projects include efficient methods for robotic navigation, macro-scale models of pedestrian interactions, surveillance-evasion games under uncertainty, mean field games, uncertainty quantification in piecewise-deterministic processes, multiobjective & randomly-terminated optimal control, seismic imaging, dimensional reduction in turbulent combustion, optimization of cancer therapies, numerical methods for Hamilton-Jacobi PDEs, and approximation of invariant manifolds. 

Andrea Stevenson Won

Assistant Professor, Department of Communication

Won’s research focuses on how virtual experiences change people’s perceptions; how nonverbal behavior by humans and autonomous agents as rendered in virtual environments affects collaboration and teamwork, and how virtual reality simulations can be used to explore the impacts and potential applications of emerging technologies.